Category: Employee Policies

  • Tips for how to effectively manage remote workers

    How many people do you know who work from home? If you feel like that number is increasing, you’re not wrong—a survey done by the Global Workplace Analytics and FlexJobs shows that remote work has grown by over 91 percent in the past decade.

    This simple workplace benefit is often seen as enticing for employers who wish to cut down on office space costs, boost employee morale, and attract top candidates who appreciate the scheduling flexibility. Mobile and online applications like Slack allow workers to communicate with each other anywhere and everywhere, no matter if they’re physically in the office or working from home, a client site, or even a tropical beach.

    On the other hand, some major companies like Bank of New York Mellon Corp, IBM, and Yahoo, have been cutting down on offering remote work options and asking their remote workers to return to the office. According to SHRM Online, this decision may have come from the following theories about why working remotely sometimes fails:

    1. Employers do not adequately train or provide proper resources to remote workers to ensure their success.
    2. Some supervisors find it harder to manage someone who they cannot communicate with face-to-face, and are uncomfortable with them ... Read More
  • Workplace mentoring benefits everyone—mentee, mentor, and their company

    In the “Odyssey” by Homer, Odysseus assigned the care and education of his son, Telemachus, to his trusted advisor Mentor. Borrowing from this ancient epic, today we use Mentor’s name to refer to someone who uses their knowledge to advise a less-experienced colleague.

    Over the last several decades, U.S. businesses have adopted mentoring as a training vehicle, mainly for young or new employees. Among Fortune 500 companies, 70 percent offer formal mentoring programs to employees.

    While some companies have structured mentoring processes, most smaller companies don’t. But mentoring new employees can take place without a formal program and with little to no expense.

    Mentorships can be an employee retention and recruiting tool

    Young or new employees can learn their jobs faster and expand their skill set if coached by  experienced mentors. Together, they can tackle issues related to problem-solving, communication, collaboration, networking, and more.

    Mentors get the satisfaction of using their knowledge to assist someone just starting out in their profession or a new position. They might benefit in other ways—many mentors report that they learn from their mentees. For example, mentors may learn about new technologies from younger employees.

    Companies with formal mentoring programs generally find they improve employee satisfaction among participants. This, in turn, ... Read More

  • Five mistakes to avoid when finding candidates for key positions

    At a time of nearly full employment, recruiting employees who are high performers can be tough. That’s why employers should watch for missteps that can cost them a leading candidate or cause them to hire the wrong person. Such avoidable errors can send the recruitment process back to square one at the company’s expense of valuable time and money.

    In order to get the most out of your recruitment efforts and land the candidates you need, plan ahead. When formulating your recruitment strategies, avoid making these mistakes:

    1. Assessing only for skills and knowledge – Evaluating a candidate’s skills and qualifications is vital, but so is assessing for personality and compatibility. Yet many companies never do this. Knowing that a candidate is a good fit for both your company and the position will result in a higher placement success rate. See our blog post on recruiting for personality as well as skills.
    2. Prolonging the recruitment process – If a recruitment process drags on too long, great candidates are lost and internal projects get delayed. If other employees pick up the slack for too long, morale can suffer. Don’t wait for the perfect candidate who may never materialize. Now, I’m not suggesting you rush ... Read More
  • Managing low performers: Confront, communicate, coach. Then commend or can them

    One of the most challenging tasks facing managers is how best to handle low-performing employees. Questions abound: Can they make an acceptable turnaround? What help should we give them? How many strikes until they’re out? How long until we cut them loose?

    If they show a sign of promise, you might want to give them a chance to redeem themselves, particularly now when good employees are hard to find and recruit. Try coaching low performers and developing action plans for them. But know how and when to terminate them properly.

    “While it’s never easy confronting individuals about poor performance, tolerating it is a failure of leadership,” says John Baldoni, executive coach and leadership educator.

    Use a mixture of sensitivity and firmness when approaching low-performing employees. Don’t express anger toward them, and never disparage them in front of fellow employees. While no process is the only right way, here are eight effective steps to address subpar performance with employees from our HR consulting firm:

    1. Address the situation as soon as you recognize a problem. Don’t procrastinate or wait for a performance review while the problem continues.
    2. Find the cause and be objective. (Employees’ lack of skills, training, or motivation? Personal problems? Unclear expectations? Poor two-way communications?)
    3. Begin ... Read More
  • Less stress is best: our seven HR consulting tips to de-stress your workplace

    While a certain degree of stress in the workplace can be expected, too much of it isn’t healthy for employees. Furthermore, it can hinder a company’s productivity by increasing turnover and absenteeism.

    According to a survey on anxiety and stress by the Anxiety and Depression Association of America, seven in 10 adults who experience work-related stress say it affects their personal relationships, mainly with spouses.

    The survey’s results show the main sources of workplace stress are deadlines, 55 percent; interpersonal relationships, 53 percent; staff management, 50 percent; and dealing with problems, 49 percent.

    But, most workers aren’t comfortable talking with their employer about their stress. Fewer than 40 percent of employees who said stress interfered with their work spoke with their employer about it.

    That’s unfortunate because managers can play an important role in creating less stressful work environments and helping employees address and manage stress.

    Here are seven ways to de-stress your work environment

    1. Allow flexible work schedules, if possible. This can reduce stress related to commuting, child care concerns, and overall work-life balance.
    2. Communicate openly with employees. Keep them informed of departmental and company changes. Ask for their feedback and be available to talk anytime.
    3. Speak positively and give sincere compliments of work done well. Recognize ... Read More
  • Addressing sexual harassment and discrimination in the workplace

    Following widespread reports of sexual harassment and gender discrimination over the past year, we all have become more aware of these serious workplace issues. These examples serve to remind us of our duty to comply with existing law and ensure that our workplaces are fair and safe for employees at every level.

    Most allegations don’t relate to behavior as obvious or salacious as the ones we hear in news reports, so don’t think your company is immune from these threats.

    Revisit and revise your policies on sexual harassment

    How is your company confronting the prospect of sexual harassment? Are your corporate policies sufficient to address the changing environment?

    If your company hasn’t reviewed and updated your sexual harassment policy lately, now is the time. Read it, mark it up with questions and comments, and ask an attorney to review it. Be sure it defines prohibited workplace behaviors and unequivocally forbids sexual harassment. That’s a start.

    But, a policy banning sexual harassment in the workplace needs to do more than just that. It should explain how employees can make a complaint, with several options for doing so. Understandably, employees who make allegations against a supervisor don’t want to approach that person with a complaint.

    Your policy should ... Read More

  • Review and update recognition and rewards to help retain employees

    If you’re running a successful business, chances are good that 1) most of your employees are of a high quality and 2) you treat them well because you would like to keep them as long as you can.

    But how often do you review your efforts to recognize and reward employees? Retaining employees takes concerted effort, and rewarding their roles in your company’s success is the best way to retain them. Your retention strategies are as important as your recruitment strategies, and some rewards are more effective in building employee loyalty and longevity.

    According to the Harvard Business Review, nearly 70 percent of U.S. workers are either actively or passively on the lookout for new jobs. So, I’m not surprised that the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that workers today remain with the same employer for just over 4 years.

    Give employees good reasons to remain with your company

    Losing good employees can have substantial costs – their lost productivity, time spent on finding and training their successors, and stress for remaining employees who pick up the slack.

    Good employees who feel valued tend to remain with the same company for more than a few years. So, the employer must give workers good reasons ... Read More

  • Exit interviews can help you improve employee staffing and training

    Does your company routinely conduct exit interviews with departing employees? If so, good, and I hope you use that information to your company’s advantage. If you don’t, you might reconsider, because you’re missing an opportunity to provide a window into your company culture and areas for improvement.

    Exit interviews let you get inside input on areas where your company excels and where it comes up short. And while it’s true that unhappy employees who are leaving might not be the most objective sources of information, comments heard repeatedly should be given credence.

    Make these actions part of your exit interview process

    • Encourage departing employees to do an exit interview, letting them know you want their critical insight. However, don’t try to mandate their participation. Ask if you can share their input with their supervisor and as part of a report to company management.
    • Ask variations of these questions every time, in addition to ones specific to your company:
      • Why are you leaving your position and the company?
      • What did you like most about your position here?
      • What did you like least about your position here?
      • How was your relationship with your supervisor?
      • Did you have the resources and support you needed to succeed in your job?
      • Were you encouraged to ... Read More