Category: Hiring Resources

  • Recruiting employees for success in entry-level positions

    There’s more than a grain of truth in the saying, “You hire for attitude, train for skills.” In fact, the late Herb Kelleher, founder and former CEO of Southwest Airlines, said, “You can always teach skills. One needs to hire attitudes that fit the firm’s culture.”

    Now, I’m not about to downplay the importance of skills. I’m a recruiter–I look for candidates who have the skills our clients need. I respect professionals who devote years to learning skills in school or on the job and, often, years more perfecting them.

    But skills alone don’t make a great employee.

    Overcoming the risk of recruiting employees at the entry level

    Have you had the following experience? You’re recruiting employees to hire for an entry-level position. You review candidates whose skills appear untested or underdeveloped. Hiring any of them feels a bit risky. I totally understand, because I’ve been there, too.

    However, someone without experience but who is sharp, upbeat and confident may be just who you need to fill that entry-level job. You can train an employee with a clean slate in a way you need for them to perform well in the job.

    Employers often have lofty requirements for positions when recruiting employees for entry-level jobs. Research by TalentWorks, a developer ... Read More

  • 7 recruitment strategies for a more diverse company workforce

    A diverse workplace, made up of employees with varied backgrounds, cultures, and perspectives, can benefit a company’s performance and bottom line. However, developing such an environment—co-workers of different ages, genders, and ethnicities—requires well-planned recruitment strategies.

    A survey by the Society for Human Resource Management found that 57 percent of recruiters say their recruitment strategies are meant to attract a diverse body of candidates. The remaining recruiters would be wise to develop such strategies of their own. Why? A survey by Glassdoor (a website for job hunters), found that 67 percent of job seekers say a diverse workforce is important to them when evaluating companies and job offers.

    That means companies that recruit and manage a diverse group of employees will have a recruitment advantage over their competitors. But the competitive advantage may go further than that. According to Forbes Insights (the strategic research arm of Forbes Media), workplace diversity is a key driver of internal innovation and business growth—that is, greater revenue.

    The upside—and yes, the downside—of expanding workplace diversity

    A study published in the American Sociological Review, based on input from 500 organizations, found that employee diversity resulted in increased sales revenue and company profit. Every 1% increase in gender diversity correlated with ... Read More

  • Adjust recruitment strategies to land promising new college graduates

    Class of 2019 college graduates are entering the best job market in years. The National Association of Colleges and Employers says that companies plan to hire about 10 percent more new graduates from this year’s class than they did last year. Employers are opening up positions to them that might have once gone to more experienced professionals. And overall, these grads can expect higher salaries than those in 2018.

    But despite their initial excitement over landing their first professional job, many won’t remain in their first jobs long. The US Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that more than half of recent college graduates leave their first job within a year, most citing a bad fit.

    Some of this turnover could be prevented by employers adopting different recruitment strategies from those they use for experienced professionals. Even career-focused students with impressive GPAs don’t know all about the industries they’re entering, nor will they be familiar with corporate policies and procedures.

    Each new graduate is essentially a blank slate of professional experience but presents an opportunity for employers to develop young potential. Investing in their youthful virtues—trainability, potential for growth, fresh perspectives, and tech know-how—can be beneficial and even profitable for your company in the ... Read More

  • Adjusting your recruitment strategies: How to fit a square peg into a round hole

    Can recruitment strategies change with the job market? Is it always necessary to find just the right person for a job—or can a square peg be reshaped to fit into a round hole?

    Currently, with record low unemployment, hiring managers might need to consider candidates who are short on desired skills but are a good company fit. On-the-job training can often fill the gap. But what else can help to ensure success?

    Kate and Rob: A study in recruitment strategies and outcomes

    Kate and Rob started the same day in customer service positions. Neither had the related experience the hiring manager had in mind. But they appeared eager to learn new skills. At the end of a six-month probation, Kate had enjoyed her customer interactions and was respected by team members. She was a shoo-in for a permanent job. But Rob struggled to address customers’ concerns adequately, and he didn’t manage staff well. He and his employer both realized he was in an ill-fitting role and agreed to part ways.

    Neither Kate nor Rob were ideally experienced for their jobs. So, why did Kate succeed in her new position, while Rob didn’t last?

    Kate thrived because her personality was well suited for it. Rob’s, however, ... Read More

  • Watch for these seven red flags when recruiting employees

    Did you hear the one about the job candidate who texted with his mother for responses as he filled out a job application? Or the one about the guy who didn’t remove his motorcycle helmet for his job interview?These aren’t jokes missing their punchlines, but rather real stories about candidates who raised red flags before they could be hired. (We’ll give the biker credit for flipping up his visor.)

    When you’re recruiting employees, pay attention to red flags that can signal trouble ahead should certain candidates be hired. If you encounter red flags during the recruitment process, it’s best to heed them and not wish them away.

    So, what are the most conspicuous warning signs? Do frequent job changes still matter? Maybe. Do typos on resumes still matter? Yep.

    These issues should raise concerns when recruiting employees

    1. Resume issues – To be sure, spelling and grammar still matter because good written and verbal communication skills remain important. But resume issues can go deeper and include poor organization, vague experience, incomplete information, and lack of measurable results.
    1. Questionable work history – While frequent job changes can have valid reasons, particularly with younger employees, inquire to find ... Read More
  • When should you hire a recruiting agency? Take our five-question quiz to find out

    Company hiring managers may be uncertain as to whether to engage a recruiting agency or handle the challenge of recruiting themselves. But with most professionals currently employed and reasonably satisfied, finding candidates for key positions is proving more difficult than ever.

    As 2018 began, 86 percent of highly qualified candidates for job vacancies were employed and not actively seeking new jobs, according to a survey by Talentnow, a recruitment software company. On the management side, 73 percent were struggling to find suitable candidates. As we near the end of the year, the situation remains much the same.

    If you need to find the best candidates for a key position, don’t procrastinate. Your search could take even longer than it would have a year or two ago.

    Take the quiz—then learn what recruiting agencies can do for you

    Below for your consideration are five questions to help you decide whether to embark on recruitment independently or contact a professional recruiting agency.

    The more “yes” answers you have, the greater the urgency for you to contact a job recruiter.

    1. Is this position particularly vital—one that has an effect on company performance and profits?
    2. Are you consumed with other responsibilities, giving you little time to devote to a search?
    3. Do you ... Read More
  • Snag the tough-to-get candidates with personalized recruitment strategies

    When recruiting hard-to-get candidates, a personalized strategy is more likely to result in success than a one-size-fits-all approach.

    Candidates who feel you take a personal interest in them will have a more favorable view of your company and be more likely to accept your position. And even if they don’t choose you this time—or you don’t choose them—you are expanding your talent pool for future available positions.

    Use the approaches used by job recruiters, particularly for top-tier candidates

    1. Search social media to get information that candidates share there (LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram) and learn more about their interests and skills. Job recruiters do this to familiarize themselves with candidates and personalize outreach to them.
    2. Customize email communications with each top candidate to get a higher response rate. If you’re not using the services of a professional recruiter (aka headhunter), you might want to get an applicant tracking system to help you do that. Keep in touch via email with each candidate, individually, throughout the search and interview process.
    3. Get to know prospects as individuals, not just as professionals with desirable skills, in your communications with them. Ask what is most important to them in deciding to change positions and try to meet their needs. If ... Read More
  • Screening resumes takes time, methodology, and sometimes, a sense of humor

    Sorting through resumes can be a time-consuming, pain-staking responsibility for managers and HR professionals. Depending on the number received, they can spend hours poring over resumes for just one position, eventually deciding on “yes,” “no,” or “maybe.” Many times, there are a few gems to be found. Professional recruiters estimate that 75-80 percent of resumes submitted actually show that the applicants are not qualified for the position.

    Some job applicants, such as the ones with these statements on their resumes, make it easy for job recruiters to decide on an emphatic “no”:

    • “Desired Position: Profreader”
    • “Left last four jobs only because the managers were completely unreasonable.”
    • “Any interruption in employment is due to being unemployed.”

    Of course, a serious candidate won’t have a resume with such blunders. So, how can managers identify the best candidates as efficiently as possible?

    Establish a review process and know what to look for in resumes

    By the time an open position is advertised, the department manager and HR representative should agree on what minimum qualifications are needed and what preferred qualifications are desired.

    Next, weed out the resumes that don’t meet the minimum qualifications. Of those remaining, pull the ones that meet all or some of the preferred qualifications. Compare them (possibly ... Read More